B.E. Curriculum 2023

Overview & ELOs

The B.E. curriculum 2023 is the most up-to-date conferral degree in bachelor of economics, designed to integrate diverse economic concepts and equip students with important skills needed in the twenty-first century. The curriculum’s core value is to strike a balance between academic rigor and practical application. In terms of academic rigor, students are provided with a strong discipline of scientifically analytical processes in economics, resulting in the development of logical and critical thinking mindsets. In terms of practical application, students in the program can study a variety of applied economics concepts while also minoring in a business-related field such as finance or marketing.

The course plans are created in accordance with the program’s expected outcomes. During their first year, students typically take general education courses required by the university, as well as some foundational concepts in economics and quantitative tools used for upper-level study. Then, students begin taking more major subject courses in their second year. Most registered courses are intermediate-level subjects that serve as a solid foundation for upper-year economics subfield courses.

Having entered their third year, students can delve deeper into the real-world applications of economic principles by choosing from a wide range of topics or issues covered in several economics subfield courses.

We offer nine subfields in economics at the B.E. international program. Each subfield area in economics is not only linked to various career options that students may pursue after graduation, but also provide conceptual framework, tools and knowledge needed for a completion of a required capstone project in their final year. The capstone project is a one-semester (a seminar subfield course) or one-year (the honor thesis) project in which students must conduct independent research on a topic to gain a thorough understanding of it. The project can be an individual or collaborative work at the discretion of the class supervisor, but it must reflect a decent quality of research project. Under each type of capstone class (seminar subfield course or honor thesis), the project investigator will assist students in developing high-level thinking skills for use in research, guiding students until the project is completed. 

At the B.E. international program, students have not only been provided with rigorous economic knowledge, but the 2023 curriculum also intends to prepare students for a variety of career options. In addition to their economics major courses and selected subfield economics courses, students may enroll in a variety of non-economics courses. Enrollment credit for these courses may be counted toward a minor field of study degree. The B.E. International Program offers three minor fields of study: finance, marketing, and free-cluster. All minor courses are taught by Thammasat business school professors and industry practitioners with certified charter. 

Ranking
Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)
Learning Process
Assessment Methods
Knowledge
K1
Acquiring knowledge and understanding of economic theories, fundamental economic tools, theory development, and applied economics
1. Lecture on theoretical knowledge
2. Problem-based learning by emphasizing problem analysis/problem-solving
3. Independent study by assigned research papers and academic projects
4. Training sessions on quantitative analysis and using technology for processing, analysis, interpretation, and effective presentation
5. Demonstrating knowledge integration in related study fields
6. Brainstorming to encourage active learning and applied knowledge
1. From assigned homework/projects/reports/ research papers
2. From quizzes and exams
3. From case study analysis/displaying knowledge and conceptual understanding
K2
Ability to apply theoretical knowledge to analyze and provide practical suggestions for economic and social issues
K3
Ability to appropriately integrate economic knowledge with other study fields
K4
Ability to attain lifelong learning and thoroughly understand world economic and societal changes and impacts
Ranking
Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)
Learning Process
Assessment Methods
Skills
S1
Acquiring intellectual skill and ability to think systematically to identify research topics, perform research, process data, and evaluate findings
1. Problem-based learning by emphasizing analysis of problems/problem-solving sources
2. Brainstorming to encourage class discussion and applied knowledge
3. Preparing research papers/projects
4. Training sessions on essential technology for education, work, and lifelong learning
5. Written and oral presentations using technology
6. Soft skills and extracurricular learning activities
1. Quizzes and examinations
2. Observation of participation in analytical thinking and proposing problem-solving guidelines
3. From the ability to use mathematical and statistical techniques to process data, analyze, interpret, and propose suggestions as shown in a report/assignment
4. From extracurricular activity participation
5. From self- and peer- evaluated participation and personal development
S2
Acquire analytical and communication skills and ability to interpret data from different sources, analyze, and integrate knowledge to propose appropriate problem-solving guidelines for economic and social issues
S3
Acquire quantitative and technological skills for research studies
Ranking
Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)
Learning Process
Assessment Methods
Ethics
E1
Acknowledge moral values and exhibit ethical traits, including decency, selflessness, and integrity
1. Learn from case studies covering ethics-related topics
2. Incorporating moral value instruction in lectures and class discussions
3. Assigning independent research projects
4. Assigning group research projects
5. Participating in analysis and providing ethical insights in case studies
6. Experiencing real-life situations
7. Developing social responsibility activities
1. From punctuality, class participation, and meeting deadlines
2. Observation
3. Peer- and self-reflections
4. Assessment forms
E2
Showing self-discipline, social responsibility, and good citizenship
E3
Respect rights, opinions, values, and dignity of others. Obey organizational and societal rules and regulations
E4
Developing professional ethics
Ranking
Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)
Learning Process
Assessment Methods
Character
C1
Ability to effectively complete assigned tasks and responsibilities
1. Individual/group assignments
2. Lecture/debate/ brainstorming/class discussion/knowledge sharing
3. Encourage asking questions in class to promote student engagement
4. Activities to encourage problem-based learning by emphasizing analysis of problem /problem-solving sources
5. Involvement in problem-solving processes by projects/research papers
6. Oral presentation
7. Extracurricular learning experiences
1. Assignment quality
2. From problem-solving processes
3. From observations of behavior/research presentations/projects/ assignments
4. From ability to convey leadership and teamwork in different situations
5. From teamwork skills and problem/case study analysis
6. Examine thought processes, connected thinking, and reasoning
C2
Ability to initiate problem analysis independently and/or in teamwork
C3
Acquire leadership and collaborative skills and respect different viewpoints
C4
Show active learning characteristics and aspire to personal development
C5
Acquire interpersonal skills and ability to collaborate and adapt to changing circumstances
Subfield in Economics
Example of Possible Career Choices
Political Economics
Public Policymakers
NGO Economists
Economics Theory
Quantitative Economics
Bank of Thailand
Academic Economists
Data-Analytic Economists
Monetary and Financial Economics
Central Bank Economists
Financial Sector Economists
International Economics
International business and finance
Public Economics
Public Policymakers
Fiscal Authority Staff
Development Economics
Development & Planning Economists
Public Policymakers
International Labor Organization
Corporate Sector Economists
Social Enterprise Firms, World Bank Economists
Environmental & Natural Resources
Economics and Human Resource
Economics
Human Resource Department
International Labor Organization
Corporate Sector Economists
Industrial Economics
Business Consulting Firms
Industry Regulators

Curriculum Structure

The Bachelor of Economics, International Program requires students to register a minimum of 131 credits in accordance with the course structure and distributed requirements as follows:

Block 1) General Education Courses
30
credits
Block 2) Major Area Courses
71
credits
2.1) Compulsory Courses
35
credits
2.2) Compulsory Elective Courses
3
credits
2.3) Cluster-Elective EE-title Courses
30
credits
2.3.1) Cluster-Elective EE-title Courses 1 (Cluster-Specific Compulsory Courses: EE-title courses with 400-level or higher code)
21
credits
2.3.2) Cluster-Elective EE-title Courses 2 (Cluster-Specific Elective Courses: EE-title courses with 300-level or higher code)
9
credits
2.4) Research Methodology
3
credits
2.5) Capstone Project or Seminar
3
credits
Block 3) Minor Area or Non-Economics Elective Courses
24
credits
Block 4) Free Elective Courses
6
credits

General Education (Gen-Ed) Courses are divided into five areas of subjects. Students are required to complete a minimum of 30 credits in Gen-Ed courses in accordance with the following course structure.

1. Students must study at least one subject in each of the five areas of Gen-Ed courses. For B.E. curriculum 2023, we require a total of 15 credits which consists of 9 credits of compulsory courses, 6 credits of compulsory elective courses in the following list.

World and Society: 1 compulsory course (3 credits)
          TU101 Thailand, ASEAN, and the World

Esthetic and Communication skills: 1 compulsory course (3 credits)
          TU106 Creativity and Communication

Science, Mathematics and Technology: Students must complete at least 1 course (3 credits) in following list
          TU103 Life and Sustainability,  or
          TU107 Digital Skill and Problem Solving

Wellbeing and Future skills: Students must complete at least 1 course (3 credits) in following list
          EL295 Academic English and Study Skills 1,  or
          TU108 Self Development and Management  

Social Services and Practical Learning: 1 compulsory course (3 credits)
          TU100 Civic Engagement

2. Students must collect another 15 credits from the Gen-Ed courses specified and offered by the B.E. program:

a.TU122
b.TU116
c.Other Gen-Ed courses offered by B.E. program 

World and Society: 1 compulsory course (3 credits)
TU101 Thailand, ASEAN, and the World
3 (3-0-6)[2]
Science, Mathematics and Technology: Students must complete at least 1 course (3 credits) in following list
TU103 Life and Sustainability
or
3 (3-0-6)
TU107 Digital Skill and Problem Solving
3 (3-0-6)
Wellbeing and Future skills: Students must complete at least 1 course (3 credits) in following list
EL295 Academic English and Study Skills
or
3 (3-0-6)
TU108 Self Development and Management
3 (3-0-6)
Social Services and Practical Learning: 1 compulsory course (3 credits)
TU100 Civic Engagement
3 (3-0-6)

3 (3 – 0 – 6) is referred to a course with 3 credits, 3-hour lecture, 0-hour laboratory session, and 6-hour self-study.

Consisting of 5 components including 32 credits of compulsory courses, 3 credits of compulsory elective courses, 30 credits of clusterspecific courses, 3 credits of research methodology and 3 credits of capstone project as follows.

Block 2.1 Compulsory courses 32 credits

2.1.1)  MA216 (or MA211) and ST216 (or ST211)

2.1.2) EL241 and EL341 

2.1.3) EE211; EE212; EE311; EE312; EE320 (or EE421) and EE325 (or EE425)

Block 2.2 Compulsory elective courses 3 credits: students are required to complete 3 credits from one of the following courses specified by the faculty.

2.2.1) EE404 History of Economic Thought, or

2.2.2) EE406 Contemporary Economic Issues, or

2.2.3) EE460 Thai Economy

Block 2.3 Cluster-Elective EE-title courses 30 credits consisting of cluster-specific compulsory courses and cluster-specific elective courses as follows

2.3.1)  21 credits of EE-title (elective) course with 400-level or higher code. 

2.3.2)  9 credits of EE-title (elective) course with 300-level or higher code. 

Block 2.4 Research methodology 3 credits

EE215 Research Methodology
3 credits

Block 2.5 Capstone project or Seminar 3 credits with 3 options:

2.5.1) EE490 Seminar in Economics
3 credits or
2.5.2) EE470 or EE4x9 Seminar in Specific Sub-Field Economics
3 credits or
2.5.3) EE500 Honors Thesis
3 credits [1]
[1]  To register in EE500, students must earn 3 credits of EE400, and maintain the cumulative GPA no less than 3.25
To fulfill the Minor area study requirement, students must enroll in at least 24 credits. (Coursework that can be applied to Minor Area Study must NOT be listed as General Education courses or Major Area Study courses, see. e.g. course catalog section[1]) Furthermore, if their enrollment in Minor Area study fulfills the requirements of a specific minor degree, students will be awarded the degree minor in the respective area. That is, in addition to the declared economics major, your minor degree will be listed on your transcript. For B.E. students, there are three minor degree options: finance, marketing, and free-cluster. Certain requirements must be met in order to obtain each type of minor degree.

Minor 1 Finance
Students must take 24 credits of Minor Area Study. To graduate with a Finance minor, at least 21 credits from the 24 credits enrolled in minor area subjects must meet the requirements listed in the table below, with a grade point average of at least 2.00.

Minor 2 Marketing
Students must take 24 credits of Minor Area Study. To graduate with a Finance minor, at least 21 credits from the 24 credits enrolled in minor area subjects must meet the requirements listed in the table below, with a grade point average of at least 2.00.  

Course code / Course Title
Category
Credits
Requirements
MK211 Consumer Behavior
Compulsory for Marketing Minor
3 credits
Receive at least C for each course
MK312 Brand Strategic
3 credits
BA291 Business in a Changing World
3 credits
Receive A, B+, B, C+, C, D+, D
MK201 Principles of Marketing
3 credits
MKXXX (Choose one from MK elective courses)
Electives for Marketing Minor
3 credits
MKXXX (Choose one from MK elective courses)
3 credits
MKXXX (Choose one from MK elective courses)
3 credits
Choose any subjects listed as Minor Area Study course and fulfill the 24 credits requirement for Minor Area Study
Electives for Minor Area Study
3 credits
Receive A, B+, B, C+, C, D+, D
Course code / Course Title
Category
Credits
Requirements
FN211 Financial Mathematics and Statistics
Compulsory for Finance Minor
3 credits
Receive at least C for each course
FN311 Financial Management
3 credits
FN312 Investments
3 credits
AC201 Fundamental Accounting
3 credits
Receive A, B+, B, C+, C, D+, D
BA291 Business in a Changing World
3 credits
FN201 Business Finance
3 credits
FNXXX (Choose one from FN elective courses)
Electives for Finance Minor
3 credits
Choose any subjects listed as Minor Area Study course and fulfill the 24 credits requirement for Minor Area Study
Electives for Minor Area Study
3 credits
Receive A, B+, B, C+, C, D+, D

Minor 3 Free-cluster
With no more than 2 fields of studies, students can mix and match any Minor Area Study courses being offered by B.E. international program, and count the credits towards 24 credits to obtain the free-cluster minor degree.  

[1] Major Area subjects, General Education courses and EE-subjects are NOT classified as Minor Area subjects. See the classification in the Course Catalog section.

 

Students may select to study any course that is offered by B.E. international program as free-elective courses at a minimum of 6 credits. The applicable courses also include the language courses and many others. However, all General Education courses cannot be used as free-elective courses.

General Education Courses

TU101
Thailand, ASEAN, and the World
Category: Compulsory Course for General Education
World and Society
3 (3-0-6)
TU122
Law in Everyday Life
Category: Compulsory Elective Course for General Education
Course Description: To study general aspects of law as correct patterns of human conduct in society. To equip learners with basic principles of public law (rules of law), and its values which are associated with citizens’ moral core. To provide basic knowledge in public law and private law, involving the issues of rights and duties, dispute settlement, Thai Justice procedures, the usage and interpretation of law principles, with an emphasis on case studies in our daily lives.
World and Society
3 (3-0-6)
TU106
Creativity and Communication
Category: Compulsory Course for General Education
Esthetic and Communication skills:
3 (3-0-6)
TU116
Man and Arts : Visual Art, Music and Performing Arts
Category: Compulsory Elective Course for General Education
Course Description: This course is a study of art in relation to its function and the development of people, society and environment by focusing on various creative works, such as visual arts, music and performing arts, depicting the culture and perception of mankind. The course also aims to instill learners with real awareness of art values through personal experience, and also the appreciation of the aesthetic values of creative works. An emphasis is placed upon the influence of art on Thai values and the Thai way of life.
Esthetic and Communication skills
3 (3-0-6)
TU103
Life and Sustainability
Category: Compulsory Elective Course for General Education
Science, Mathematics and Technology
3 (3-0-6)
TU107
Digital Skill and Problem Solving
Category: Compulsory Elective Course for General Education
Science, Mathematics and Technology
3 (3-0-6)
EL115
English Communication for Careers
Category: Compulsory Elective Course for General Education
Course Description: Development of language and communication skills for careers. Strategies for presentations, networking, persuading, meetings, public relations, and negotiations. Study of social and business etiquette in professional contexts.
Wellbeing and Future skills
3 (3-0-6)
EL295
Academic English and Study Skills 1
Category: Compulsory Elective Course for General Education
Wellbeing and Future skills
3 (3-0-6)
TU108
Self Development and Management
Category: Compulsory Elective Course for General Education
Wellbeing and Future skills
3 (3-0-6)
TU100
Civic Engagement
Category: Compulsory Course for General Education
Social Services and Practical Learning
3 (3-0-6)

Major Area Study Courses

EE400
Seminar for Honor Thesis
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): (a) EE215 and (b) a minimum of three 400-level (or above level) economics Course and (c) having earned a cumulative GPA of 3.25 or higher at the beginning of the semester enrolled
Course Description: Students choose research topics, write research proposals based on research methodology, and prepare and present honor thesis proposals with the approval of honor thesis advisors and honor thesis committee appointed by the Faculty of Economics. Note: This course is offered only in the first semester of each academic year
General Course for Major Area Study
3 (3-0-6)
EE490
Seminar in Economics
Category: Capstone Project
Prerequisite(s): (a) EE215 (b) a minimum of four 400 level (or the above level) courses in the field
Course Description: Seminar and Selection of research topics; development of stages of research; data collection and analysis, report writing under the supervision of the lecturer.
General Course for Major Area Study
3 (3-0-6)
EE500
Honor Theis
Category: Capstone Project
Prerequisite(s): (a) EE400 and (b) having earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 at the beginning of the semester enrolled, and with the consent of the assigned advisor.
Course Description: Students conduct research and write their theses under the supervision and guidance of their thesis advisor and present honor thesis with the approval of honor thesis advisors and honor thesis committees appointed by the Faculty of Economics.
General Course for Major Area Study
3 (3-0-6)
EL241
English for Economists 1
Category: Compulsory Course for Major Area Study
Course Description:

Development of language skills in English for economics through lectures, reading, and discussion of contemporary issues. Practice and use of relevant vocabulary and study skills including note taking, paraphrasing and group discussions of basic economic issues. Skills development in describing economic trends, making predictions, and conducting economic debates.

General Course for Major Area Study
3 (3-0-6)
EL341
English for Economists 2
Category: Compulsory Course for Major Area Study
Prerequisite(s): EL241
Course Description: Advanced English language practice in speaking, reading, listening and writing related to the field of economics. Practice in presenting opinions of current global events through group discussions, written reports and academic presentations.
General Course for Major Area Study
3 (3-0-6)
MA216
Calculus for Social Science 1
Category: Compulsory Course for Major Area Study
Course Description: Limits and continuity of one variable functions, derivatives of algebraic functions and transcendental functions, implicit differentiation, higher order derivatives, Rolle’s theorem, the mean value theorem, applications of the derivative for determining limits and maximum and minimum of functions, differentials and its applications, antiderivatives, indefinite integrals and integration, definite intergrals and applications of area solving, functions of several variables, limits and continuity of functions of several variables, partial derivatives, the chain rule, total differential and its applications.
Remark 1: No credit for students who are currently taking or have earned credits of MA111 or MA211 or MA218 or AM101.
General Course for Major Area Study
3 (3-0-6)
ST 216
Statistics for Social Science 1
Category: Compulsory Course for Major Area Study
Course Description:

Introduction to descriptive statistics; index numbers; unconditional and conditional probability; random variables and probability distribution; unconditional and conditional expectations; elementary sampling and sampling distribution; estimation and hypotheses testing for one population; statistical package results interpretation.

Remark 1: No credits for students who passed or studying TU155
General Course for Major Area Study
3 (3-0-6)
EE301
History of Thai Economy
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (300-level)
Prerequisite(s):
Course Description: Studying the evolution of Thailand’s economic system. The study focuses on examining the development of Thailand’s economic and social structure, while also investigating the roles of the state in the economy. The study links the changes in the Thai economy to the related economic, political, and social factors, both at the national and global levels.
Field : 0
Political Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE302
History of World Economy
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (300-level)
Course Description: Analyzing the history and development of world capitalism. The importance of the world economy is emphasized by selected topics such as the birth of capitalism, the Industrial Revolution, colonization, the Great Depression of the 1930s, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the development of Chinese and East Asian economies, the Oil Crises, and the World Financial Crises.
Field : 0
Political Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE401
Political Economics
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): a) EE210 or b) EE211 and EE212 or c) EE213 and EE214
Course Description:

Analyzing the development of capitalism. Theories and methodology of different schools of Economic thought from classical political economics to Karl Marx ‘ s political economics, post-Marxist political economics.

Field : 0
Political Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE402
Institutional Economics
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): a) EE210 or b) EE211 and EE212 or c) EE213 and EE214
Course Description: Studying the development of institutional economics thought. Analyzing how institutions shape the incentives of economic agents, and how this influences socioeconomic outcomes. Examining factors contributing to the formation and demise of institutions, transactional costs, and changes within institutions. Using mainstream Economics to analyze the political market structure, political phenomena, and rent-seeking behavior as exercised by government bodies. Studying how Special Interest Groups (SIGs) impact economic policies.
Field : 0
Political Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE403
Law and Economics
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): a) EE210 or b) EE211 and EE212 or c) EE213 and EE214
Course Description:

Thailand ‘ s Legal System. The relationship between law, economy, and politics. Applying economic theory to analyze reasons for the existence of property rights, civil, and commercial law. The effects of law on economic behavior and on economic outcomes.

Field : 0
Political Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE404
History of Economic Thought
Category: Compulsory Elective Course for Major Area Study
Prerequisite(s): a) EE210 or b) EE211 and EE212 or c) EE213 and EE214
Course Description: Studying philosophical foundations, main ideas of different schools of economic thoughts, and debates among economists from past to present. Studying socio-economic and important events in history that influence economic ideas.
Field : 0
Political Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE406
Contemporary Economic Issues
Category: Compulsory Elective Course for Major Area Study
Prerequisite(s): EE211 and EE212
Course Description: This course is a general introduction to the subject matter and methods of economics, through the investigation of specific contemporary economic issues such as economic growth, inequality, poverty, and environmental deterioration. The focus also is on how economists address these issues.
Field : 0
Political Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE409
Seminar in Political Economics and Economic History
Category: Capstone Project
Prerequisite(s): Having completed at least two 400-level (or the above level) courses in the field of Political Economics and Economic History, excluding EE400, EE404, EE406 and EE500.
Course Description: Seminar and research on specific topics in Political Economics and Economic History under the supervision of the lecturer.
Field : 0
Political Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE501
Selected Topics in Political Economics 1
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Course Description: Studying selected topics in Political Economics and Economic History to be announced later.
Field : 0
Political Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE502
Selected Topics in Political Economics 2
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Course Description: Studying selected topics in Political Economics and Economic History to be announced later.
Field : 0
Political Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE210
Introductory Economics
Category: For Students who are not Economics major only
Course Description: This course introduces the economic method of thinking to better understand real-world decision-making and improve analytical skills to better understand business and policy concerns. The fundamentals of modern economics, the general principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics, are introduced. Microeconomics covers how to apply the fundamental economic principles that explain why individuals and businesses make decisions with limited resources. The interactions of supply and demand in market operations are covered, as well as a variety of market structures ranging from monopoly to perfect competition. Furthermore, the course explores different sorts of failures and how government intervention policies might increase social welfare. Microeconomics covers how to apply the fundamental economic principles that explain why individuals and businesses make decisions with limited resources. The interactions of supply and demand in market operations are covered, as well as a variety of market structures ranging from monopoly to perfect competition. Furthermore, the course explores different sorts of failures and how government intervention policies might increase social welfare.
Remark 1: For non-Economics majors only; credits will not be awarded to students who are taking or have completed EE211 or EE212 or EE213 or EE214
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE211
Principles of Microeconomics
Category: Compulsory Course for Major Area Study
Prerequisite(s):
Course Description: The course covers the principle microeconomic theories for making decisions under scarcity. The fundamentals of supply and demand, as well as their determinants, are established in the introduction to consumer and producer theories. Supply and demand collaborate to establish pricing and resource allocation efficiency through two basic market structures: monopoly and perfect competitive markets, and competitive factor markets. The principles and effects of market failures are also introduced.
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE212
Principles of Macroeconomics
Category: Compulsory Course for Major Area Study
Course Description: The course covers the principle macroeconomic theories that explain how the economy works at a macro level and the mechanisms via which policies might intervene. The course covers the most important macroeconomic measurements and issues. The accelerator principle, money markets, the theory of supply and demand for money, the joint equilibrium model of product and money markets (IS-LM model), the balance of payments, and fiscal and monetary policy as means of stabilizing an economy are all discussed. The concept of collecting and managing Thai macroeconomic data for the purpose of analyzing economic situations is introduced.
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE213
Introductory Microeconomics
Category: For Students who are not Economics major only
Course Description: The course provides a practical understanding of the core economic principles that explain why consumers and companies make their decisions given scarce resources. The topics include the interactions of supply and demand of market operations, through wide-range market structures, ranging from monopoly to perfect competition. Moreover, the course also explains types of failures, in which the role of government intervention policy can improve social welfare.
Remark 1: For students who are not Economics majors
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE214
Introductory Macroeconomics
Category: For Students who are not Economics major only
Course Description: The course will provide you a practical understanding of the fundamental macroeconomic theories that explain how the economy functions and how macroeconomic policies affect it. The course will cover key macroeconomic measurements, problems, and policy performance, as well as the determinants of national income, employment, and price level, the role of monetary policy and the banking system in stabilizing the economy, and the role of monetary and fiscal policies in stabilizing the economy. The balance of payments, foreign currency market and exchange rate determination, and the use of economic indicators to understand economic circumstances are all covered in the international economics part.
Remark 1: For students who are not Economics majors
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE215
Research Methodology
Category: Compulsory Course for Major Area Study
Prerequisite(s): EE211 and EE212 and EE325 (or EE425)
Course Description:

Study methods of conducting research and writing report in economics by studying the meaning and objectives and economic research characteristics. Study the composition and process of conducting research consisting of topic selection. Defining Objectives and Scopes setting and testing hypotheses for the use of educational theories and methods; Various statistical sources, both primary and secondary. preparation of research projects, proposals, data processing, and analysis and writing of research reports

Remark 1: Evaluation is based on ‘Satisfactory ‘ (S)/ ‘ Unsatisfactory ‘ (U) grading.
Remark 2: This course is only for economics students.
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE311
Microeconomic Theory
Category: Compulsory Course for Major Area Study
Prerequisite(s): EE211 (or EE213) and MA216 (or MA211)
Course Description: Consumer behavior focuses on indifference curve analysis, intertemporal consumption, consumption, and risks. Theory of production and cost, the birth of the firm using information cost, structure and behavior of imperfectly competitive markets which are a monopoly, monopolistic competition, and duopoly markets. Introduction to game theory. Price setting in practice. Price determination in factor markets, general equilibrium analysis, welfare Economics, market failures ,and measures to correct.
Field : 1
Economics Theory
4 (4-0-8)
EE312
Macroeconomic Theory
Category: Compulsory Course for Major Area Study
Prerequisite(s): a) EE211 and EE212 or b) EE213 and EE214
Course Description: The course discusses the economy’s mechanism using a general equilibrium approach, which proposes appropriate government policies to stabilize and boost economic growth. Classics, New Classics, Keynesian, and New Keynesian school of thinking are all used to create appropriate policies. The role of how the labor market perceives and responds to information in determining the character of aggregate supply and the Phillips curve is examined for the closed economy. The static and dynamic elements of aggregate supply and demand interactions are investigated. Furthermore, the microeconomics foundation is utilized to investigate how agents react to one another, to policies, and to the economy’s growth. The model of joint equilibrium (IS-LM-BP) in product markets, money markets, and foreign exchange markets for an open economy.
Field : 1
Economics Theory
4 (4-0-8)
EE411
Microeconomic Analysis
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): EE311 and EE320 (or EE421)
Course Description: Microeconomic theory with an emphasis on utilizing mathematical tools to analyze economic issues such as consumer behavior, revealed preferences, intertemporal consumption, consumption under risk, theories of production and cost, market structures and behavior of markets, and other topics that the lecturer finds suitable.
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE412
Macroeconomic Analysis
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): EE312 and EE320 (or EE421)
Course Description: Macroeconomic theory with an emphasis on utilizing mathematical tools and dynamic framework to analyze economic issues, such as, general equilibrium and welfare analysis in modern Macroeconomics, analysis of long-term growth, analysis of short-term growth and fluctuations both theoretically and empirically, roles of government in the economy, modern concepts for macroeconomic policy analytical frameworks, and the other topics that the lecturer finds suitable.
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE415
Game Theory
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): EE311 and EE320 (or EE421)
Course Description: The application of game theory with complete and incomplete information including strategic games, Nash Equilibrium, mixed-strategies equilibrium, extensive games, subgame perfect equilibrium, Bayesian games, extensive games of incomplete information, and other topics that the lecturer finds suitable.
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE416
Behavioral Economics
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): EE311
Course Description: Concepts and frameworks in behavioral economics including a comparative study of models for decision under uncertainty between mainstream economics and behavioral economics, empirical evidence that support behavioral economics, models that incorporate psychological and sociological factors for consumer and social behaviors, and other topics that the lecturer finds suitable.
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE511
Selected Topics in Economic Theory 1
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Course Description: Studying topics in Economic Theory to be announced later.
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE512
Selected Topics in Economic Theory 2
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Course Description: Studying topics in Economic Theory to be announced later.
Field : 1
Economics Theory
3 (3-0-6)
EE320
Introductory Mathematical Economics
Category: Compulsory Course for Major Area Study
Prerequisite(s): a) EE211, EE212 and MA216 (or MA211) or b) EE213, EE214 and MA 216 (or MA 211)
Course Description: Applying mathematical concepts and tools such as functions, equations, matrices, univariate and multivariate differential calculus, constrained and unconstrained optimization, and basic integral to understand the relationship between different economic variables and explain concepts of Microeconomic theory and Macroeconomic theory. An emphasis will be placed on relationships between total, average, and marginal functions, the analyses of elasticity, market equilibrium, impacts of taxation, and the basic input-output model.
Remark 1: Credits will not be awarded to students who are taking or have completed EE421
Field : 2.1
Quantitative Economics: Mathematical Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE421
Mathematical Economics 1
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): MA217 (or MA212) and having completed or currently taking EE311
Course Description: The application of matrices, Jacobian determinants, derivatives, partial derivatives and optimization, with and without constraints, to explain theories in Microeconomics and Macroeconomics, such as the theory of consumer behavior, the theory of production, equilibrium in goods and factor markets, equilibrium of national income in product and money markets, international trade, comparative static equilibrium analysis, the input-output model, determination of maximum-minimum point and duality of linear programming.
Field : 2.1
Quantitative Economics: Mathematical Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE422
Mathematical Economics 2
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): EE421 and having completed or currently taking EE312
Course Description: Applying mathematical tools such as integral calculus, differential equations, difference equations, phase diagram, and dynamic optimization such as optimal control theory and dynamic programming to explain dynamic economic phenomena as well as to locate the time and stability of variables in the context of both Microeconomics and Macroeconomics. The study of dynamic input-output models is also covered.
Field : 2.1
Quantitative Economics: Mathematical Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE423
Data Analytics Programing for Economists
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): EE320 and EE325
Course Description: This course is an introduction to programming such as Python or R to undertake analysis of data. It is aimed at preparing the knowledge of computers and programming for analyzing data in economics and finance. The course goes on to cover data cleansing, the manipulation of data, and basic statistics in explaining the data. The course will also cover how data can be visualized and the knowledge of how the data can be transformed and reduced to its dimension.
Field : 2.1
Quantitative Economics: Mathematical Economics
3 (3-0-6)
EE424
Data Science for Economics and Finance
Category: Elective Course for Major Area Study (400-level or above)
Prerequisite(s): EE423
Course Description: This course will cover topics that range between Supervised (predictive) and Unsupervised Machine Learning methods. Examples include Regression and K Nearest Neighbors, Classification, Dimensionality Reduction, Decision Trees and Random Forests, Principal Component Analysis and Clustering Analysis. All computing in this course will be conducted in R or Python. The course will focus on the case studies with applications to data sets used to study economic and finance phenomena.
Field : 2.1
Quantitative Economics: Mathematical Economics